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December 30, 2013 • Basketball

Basketball: Two plays from Villanova’s Jay Wright

Jay Wright

Jay Wright, the head men’s basketball coach at Villanova, utilizes a four-out, one-in motion offense that consistently makes the Wildcats one of the top teams in the Big East.

Out of Wright’s basic offensive set, he runs several plays that work to get “the right shot for the right person at the right time.” Two of these plays — Wing’ and ‘Pop — are illustrated below. Wright offers his “”quick”” and “motion” versions of both plays.

Wing

Wing is designed to have your point guard use ball screens. If your post player is good in isolation on one side of the court, this is a successful play to use.

This play also helps when you want to “dribble through a good shooter,” eventually having that shooter get the ball in their hands with an open look at a 3-pointer.

Jay Wright1DIAGRAM 1: Quick Wing (A). Quick Wing starts with 1 dribbling at 2. 2 clears through to the opposite corner. 4 and 3 fill spots on the perimeter. 5 begins to come out from the post to get in a position to set a ball screen for 1.

 

 


Jay Wright2DIAGRAM 2: Quick Wing (B). 5 sets the ball screen for 1 by straddling the 3-point line. 1 begins dribbling off the screen back toward the middle of the court. 3 and 4 set a staggered screen for 2 (the shooter).

3 then pops to the corner, while 4 flashes to the ball before running to the rim. 2 waits for 1 to clear the ball screen by two dribbles, then comes off the staggered screen and receives a pass from 1 for an open shot.

If the defense fights over the top of the ball screen, which means they are trailing the play, this creates an opening for the point guard to get to the rim. In this instance, 5 sets the ball screen deeper toward the corner for 1. This provides 1 with more space to operate and get to the rim.

If you have a good 5 who can shoot from the outside, or if you want to provide 5 with room to make a play, have 5 set the screen at the foul-line extended. This opens the entire left-hand side of the floor for 5 if he or she receives a pass from 1.


Motion Wing creates some “false motion,” making the defense think you’re running a different offensive set. But the goal is to get the ball back into 1’s hands in either slot to run the same play again.

Jay Wright3DIAGRAM 3: Motion Wing (A). To start the “false motion,” 1 passes to 2 before clearing through the lane to the opposite corner. 4 and 3 shift into the next perimeter spot closest to the ball.

2 passes to 4. 3 then moves to the opposite corner to screen for 2. 2 uses the screen to move to the opposite slot and receives a pass from 4. 5 comes across the lane.

Now, 1 has the ball in the slot (only on the other side of the court) and you’re ready to run Wing again.


Jay Wright4DIAGRAM 4: Motion Wing (B). 1 dribbles toward 3. 3 clears to the opposite corner. 2 and 4 shift into the next available perimeter positions. 5 moves into position to set a ball screen for 1.

 

 


Jay Wright5DIAGRAM 5: Motion Wing (C). 5 sets the ball screen for 1. 2 and 4 set the staggered screen for 3. 1 dribbles off the ball screen.

3 waits for 1 to clear the ball screen by two dribbles, then comes to the top of the set. 1 passes to 3 for the open shot.

 


‘Pop

Pop is a play to use when your post player has the ability to make a move off the dribble.

Jay Wright6DIAGRAM 6: Quick Pop. Quick Pop starts with 4 coming to set a ball screen for 1. 4 straddles the 3-point line and sets the screen. As soon as 1 starts to dribble toward the screen, 3 flashes to the ball with his or her hands in a ready position. 2 sprints to the opposite corner. 1 dribbles off 4’s shoulder, then drags the dribble out.

After setting the screen, 4 makes a hard cut to just below the elbow. 5 waits for 1 to clear the screen, then takes one hard V-cut toward the lane and pops to the foul-line-extended area off the elbow. This provides 5 with a good angle to the rim. 1 passes to 5. 5 catches the pass, rips the ball through and drives hard to the rim.

To keep the defense off-balance, add some “false motion” into the Pop play.


Jay Wright7DIAGRAM 7: Motion Pop (A). 1 passes to 4 in the opposite slot and screens away for 2. 2 comes to the slot and receives a pass from 4.

 

 

 


Jay Wright8DIAGRAM 8: Motion Pop (B). 4 sets a ball screen for 2. 2 uses the ball screen, then 4 rolls through the lane. 3 comes toward the ball. 5 moves from the low post to the high post.

 

 


Jay Wright9DIAGRAM 9: Motion Pop (C). 5 continues moving all the way out beyond the 3-point arc. 2 passes to 5. 5 continues the ball reversal by passing to 1.

4 moves across the lane. 2 and 5 sets a staggered screen for 3. 3 uses the screen to come free and receives a pass from 1.

 


Jay Wright10DIAGRAM 10: Motion Pop (D). The false motion continues with 3 passing to 5. 3 screens away for 1. 3 continues through the lane to the opposite corner. 1 uses the screen and receives a pass in the slot from 5.

Now, 1 has the ball in the slot and you are ready to run Pop again.

 


Jay Wright11DIAGRAM 11: Motion Pop (E). 5 comes across and sets a ball screen for 1. 1 dribbles off the screen as 5 then moves to the area just below the elbow. 4 pops to the free-throw-extended area and 1 passes to 4.

4 catches the pass, rips the ball through and makes a move to the rim.


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